What Happens If Lightning Strikes a Car and You’re Not Ready For It

What Happens If Lightning Strikes a Car and You're Not Ready For It

What if you’re driving and a bolt of lightning strikes your car? What will you do? Well, according to the National Weather Service, lightning strikes can result in a lot of damage. But that doesn’t tell the whole story. A strike can also cause serious problems for people who aren’t in their cars. In fact, lightning has been known to kill people by frying brain cells or by causing their hearts to stop. So what if you’re driving and a bolt of lightning strikes your car? What will you do? Well, according to the National Weather Service, lightning strikes can result in a lot of damage. But that doesn’t tell the whole story. A strike can also cause serious problems for people who aren’t in their cars. In fact, lightning has been known to kill people by frying brain cells or by causing their hearts to stop.

What Happens If Lightning Strikes a Car?

The first thing that happens is that the car will start. The second thing that happens is that the windows will start to close. The next thing that happens is that the airbag will activate in the car and it will inflate. This gives you some protection against lightning strikes. The airbag will protect you from being electrocuted by lightning. If the lightning strikes, it will shock you, which will immobilize you so you won’t be hurt by the lightning.

What To Do If Your Car Is Struck By Lightning?

  1. If your car is struck by lightning, you should get out of the car. The airbag will help protect you from being electrocuted by lightning. The airbag will also help protect you from being burned by the hot metal of the car after it’s struck by lightning.
  2. If your car has a windshield, remove it so that you’ll be able to see what’s going on around you. You want to be able to see where the lightning is coming from and where it’s going to strike so that you can avoid it.
  3. If your car has a convertible top, remove it so that you can see what’s going on around you and get out of the way of any falling objects that may fall from the sky if there are no longer any cars around them to block their fall. If possible, put your seat back in place so that people can easily get into their cars if they run into them when they’re trying to exit their cars to get away from a storm that has just passed through or after a storm has passed through without them realizing it until they’re already in their cars and driving toward an area where another storm is forming or another storm is already there waiting for them.
  4. If your car has a hood, remove it so that you can see what’s going on around you and get out of the way of any falling objects that may fall from the sky if there are no longer any cars around them to block their fall. If possible, put your seat back in place so that people can easily get into their cars if they run into them when they’re trying to exit their cars to get away from a storm that has just passed through or after a storm has passed through without them realizing it until they’re already in their cars and driving toward an area where another storm is forming or another storm is already there waiting for them.
  5. If your car has windows, remove them so that you’ll be able to see what’s going on around you and get out of the way of any falling objects that may fall from the sky if there are no longer any cars around them to block their fall. If possible, put your seat back in place so that people can easily get into their cars if they run into them when they’re trying to exit their cars to get away from a storm that has just passed through or after a storm has passed through without them realizing it until they’re already in their cars and driving toward an area where another storm is forming or another storm is already there waiting for them.
  6. If your car does not have windows but does have doors, make sure all of the doors are closed before getting out of the car. If you are unable to close all of the doors, leave them open and get out of the car before you open up the windows so that you can see what’s going on around you and get out of the way of any falling objects that may fall from the sky if there are no longer any cars around them to block their fall. If possible, put your seat back in place so that people can easily get into their cars if they run into them when they’re trying to exit their cars to get away from a storm that has just passed through or after a storm has passed through without them realizing it until they’re already in their cars and driving toward an area where another storm is forming or another storm is already there waiting for them.

What To Do When Your Car Won’t Start after lightning?

  1. If your car is not running, get out of the car quickly before you put the key into the ignition. If you are unable to get out of the car, stay in your seat and close your door so that you can see what’s going on around you and get out of the way of any falling objects that may fall from the sky if there are no longer any cars around them to block their fall. If possible, put your seat back in place so that people can easily get into their cars if they run into them when they’re trying to exit their cars to get away from a storm that has just passed through or after a storm has passed through without them realizing it until they’re already in their cars and driving toward an area where another storm is forming or another storm is already there waiting for them.
  2. If the car still won’t start after you’ve done all of this, call a tow truck or call for help from someone who can help you with your vehicle.
  3. Once help arrives, leave everything else as it is and let someone else take over driving while you go find somewhere safe inside where it’s safe to wait until everything has calmed down around you again.

Wrapping Up

The good news is that most car lightning strikes are very minor compared to the damage they cause. A lightning strike that causes a short circuit in the car or a blast inside the car can be very damaging. But a lightning strike that doesn’t do any damage at all can be very satisfying. If the lightning strike doesn’t do any damage at all, it’s often referred to as a “no show.” That’s when the weather is perfectly calm and clear, and all a lightning strike needs is a little bit of electrical current flowing through it to create a flash of light. If you’re in a no-show car, you won’t be able to relive the thrill of being in the car when a bolt of lightning hits. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t enjoy the car as much as possible!

FAQ’s

Q: Will the car lightning strike again?

A: No, it’s over. The bolt has hit and passed through the car, and you’re safe. You may want to think about calling a tow truck driver or a mechanic to help you take your vehicle in for a checkup, but that’s up to you.

Q: Why do some cars get struck by lightning while others don’t?

A: Lightning can strike anywhere that there is an electrical charge in the atmosphere. If there are no cars around, they’ll usually strike somewhere where there are trees or power lines. But if there are cars around, they’ll usually strike where there is an electrical charge in the air between two vehicles rather than between two trees or between two power lines.

Q: What does it feel like when lightning strikes a car?

A: It feels like nothing at all! No flash of light or noise will be visible from inside your car as a result of a lightning strike at all! It’s completely silent! The only thing that will happen is that the radio will stop working for about 5 seconds after the lightning bolt has hit your car and passed through it. Once that happens, everything should be fine again! If you have full-time security alarms on your car, then those will probably go off after the radio stops working because they rely on radio signals as well as electricity to operate properly. You may want to consider getting new full-time security alarms installed if you have them.